I'm learning some Python programming and decided to make a geodesic dome. It's working pretty well, only that it produces a full geodesic globe. It makes an 'perfect' dome, so you get quite a lot of different strut lengths if there are many subdivisions. A next step would maybe be to approximate the triangles to reduce the amount of different strut lengths, but that sounds like a complicated process...

I'll upload it to the Dynamo packages server soon.

Geodesic%20Dome%20v0.1.3.dyf

Views: 275

Tags: geodesic dome, python, subdivision

Comment by Håvard Vasshaug on March 24, 2014 at 8:50am

Awesome Thomas. Any chance of seeing screen shots of the dyn and python script?

Comment by Tom Vollaro on March 24, 2014 at 9:48am

been wanting to do this for awhile. I would love to look at your definition!

Comment by Matt Jezyk on March 24, 2014 at 9:33pm

Nice! we created a python-based geodesic dome node last summer but it was before we had the package manager and I never got around to publishing it. I'd love to see your version.

why would the struts be different sizes?

Comment by Thomas Holth on March 25, 2014 at 9:44am

Hi, I put a link to the dyf-file in the blog post, so feel free to look at it. I'm no expert in geodesic domes, so it could be I got something wrong. Any comments would be appreciated.

The script works by subdividing the triangles of a icosahedron and then project the points to the surface of a sphere. This way of subdividing the the icosahedron will make the triangles a little bit different according to there position relative to the original points of the icosahedron. The struts are also different accordingly. A dome subdivided 4 times will have six different strut lengths. A dome subdivided 5 times will have 8 different strut lengths.

So if you do a lot of subdivisions you get lots of different strut lengths. I understand that you the should rationalize it somehow, but I don't know how.

Comment by Shalom Ormsby on March 25, 2014 at 2:37pm

Very cool! Thanks for sharing the script.

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